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Description | Intended Audience | Intended Implementation Model | Activity | Materials | Goal | Overview

Authors: Brandon C. Beltz, Edna Monroe, and Denise Williford

Description: This Web site is a multimedia instructional design site intended to teach students the scientific method. The site is set up with an accessible navigation bar on the left side of the screen to provide access to the major sections of the site. The hyper-linked numbers at the bottom of majority of the site provide navigation between the different subsections of the major sections. The subsections are intended to allow the student to easily progress through the entire lesson with minimal confusion. The lesson uses text, graphics, videos, mnemonics, an example, and simple explanations to demonstrate the scientific method. For our example we did a simple experiment to see which of two paper towels would absorb more water.

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Intended Audience: Late elementary school students for the first time learning the scientific method or middle school students in seek of review.

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Intended Implementation Model: This site is intended to be used as a supplemental site. As a supplement, this site's role is to provide the students with visual aids that reinforce the concepts as the teacher conducts the lesson. It is also an excellent site for the review of the scientific method.

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Activity:

  1. Introduce the concepts to be taught.

  2. Walk students through the following steps:

    1. Open Netscape Navigator

    2. Go to this Web site (http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~bcb25/scimeth/index.htm)

    3. Explain the layout of the web site.

  3. Walk the students through the introduction of the scientific method

  4. Stop to provide students with an example application of the scientific method. "The paper towel theory."

  5. Move on to explain the concept of a problem as it relates to the scientific method and explain the example of the problem in "the paper towel theory." Show the students the two paper towels.

  6. Move on to explain the concept of an observation as it relates to the scientific method and explain the example of the observations in "the paper towel theory." Pass the paper towels around to the students so they can observe the differences for themselves.

  7. Move on to explain the concept of a hypothesis as it relates to the scientific method and explain the example of the hypothesis in "the paper towel theory." Ask the students which paper towel they think will absorb more water.

  8. Move on to explain the concept of an experiment as it relates to the scientific method and explain the example of the experiment in "the paper towel theory." Demonstrate the experiment for the students.

  9. Move on to explain the concept of a conclusion as it relates to the scientific method and explain the example of the conclusion in "the paper towel theory." Ask the students if the their hypothesis was supported by the experiment.

  10. Have the students brainstorm for their own application of the scientific method.

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Materials:

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Goal: This lesson will teach students the purpose, application, and steps of the scientific method. Students will be able to apply the scientific method to everyday life situations to help them make decisions and predictions. Students will understand how scientists test hypotheses by using the scientific method. This lesson plan is intended for junior high students.

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Overview: Please click here for the html version of the overview, or here for an overview of this web site in Word 2000 format.

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